IOM Provides Humanitarian Relief to Venezuelans in Guyana

Date Publish: 
10/12/2018

Georgetown – IOM, the UN Migration Agency, is providing essential non-food items (NFI) such as personal hygiene products (insect repellent, soap, toothpaste), cleaning products (buckets, detergents, chlorine), along with mosquito nets, hammocks, and blankets to highly vulnerable Venezuelan migrants in Guyana.

The initiative, carried out as part of IOM Regional Action Plan (RAP), has reached over 793 Venezuelan migrants, particularly members of the indigenous Warao tribe arriving in the regions of Barima Waini and Pomerron Supanaam.

Many Venezuelans are using boats to cross into Guyana, where they are arriving without food, shelter, and other necessities. Since most of them are only fluent in the Warao dialect, communication has proved difficult.

IOM has distributed lifesaving information, including guides on how to access documentation and the regularization process in Region 4 (Demerara-Mahaica) and Region 2. Thanks to a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) signed with the Venezuelan Support Group (VSG) and the help of the Civil Defense Commission, IOM has been able to distribute this information in borderline areas that are difficult to access.

IOM Displacement Tracking Matrix (DTM) has also been deployed to understand the needs and identify vulnerabilities in the migrant population, particularly in those with a higher risk of becoming victims of human trafficking, smuggling, and irregular migrants. In a first phase, DTM was implemented in Regions 1 and 4, as well as in Georgetown. This initial stage of the study concluded on September 5 and will be made available later during the year.

In parallel, IOM Guyana has organized workshops to train first-line response officers from the Ministry of the Presidency, Guyana Defence Forces, Ministry of Indigenous Affairs, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Guyana Public Force, Ministry of Communities, Department of Migration, and the Ministry of Public Health on issues such as human trafficking, smuggling and other vulnerabilities; direct assistance and referral systems.

Other UN and regional agencies participated in training sessions, including the Pan American Health Organization, the United Nations Children´s Fund (UNICEF) and the United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR).

These humanitarian aid efforts to assist Venezuelan migrants and strengthen government capacity in Guyana have been made possible thanks to funding from the United Nations Central Emergency Response Fund (CERF). 

For more information, contact Tanika Jones at IOM Guyana, e-mail: tjones@iom.int, Tel +592 231 6533

Tags: 
asistencia humanitaria, Venezuela, migración

World Day Against Trafficking in Persons 2020

Date Publish: 
30 / 07 / 2020

António Vitorino

Director General, International Organization for Migration (IOM) 

World Day Against Trafficking in Persons 

 30 July 2020 

 

This year is the twentieth anniversary of the UN Convention Against Transnational Organized Crime, and its historic Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children. 

We are half-way through a very difficult year for everyone, and our contemporary challenges have had a severe impact on people’s vulnerability to trafficking and exploitation. 

IOM was implementing counter-trafficking interventions in accordance with human rights principles long before the Palermo Protocol gave us the clearly defined parameters that we know today. And likewise, our interventions have evolved over time as new forms of trafficking have emerged. 

We have learned, as have governments, that it is imperative to partner with the private sector, trade unions, supply chain auditors, and recruitment agencies to put in place practices to reduce the risks of trafficking and exploitation. 

As we embark upon a new decade, the world is now confronted with perhaps our biggest challenge to counter-trafficking – that of a pandemic, that has in addition brought severe restrictions to mobility, impacted livelihoods, and limited access to vulnerable people. COVID-19 has brought a devastating impact upon the household security and health of billions of people all over the world, which inevitably heightens vulnerability and risk of exploitation, whether it is job-seekers taking hazardous journeys, families relying on child labour for survival, or the marriage of young daughters in a desperate attempt to relieve economic strain. 

Now, as we have always done, the anti-trafficking community must evolve and adapt to this new crisis, finding innovative ways to identify trends, to screen for vulnerabilities, to support States while advocating for human rights and the prevention of abuse, and to seek safe and viable options for those who will remain on the move.  Let's move into this direction together, as united we are stronger! 

End