Migrant Youtubers

 

They have created new ways to express themselves, have fun, relate to others, and even new ways of living. Some of them publish videos on a monthly or weekly basis, but the most active ones, publish videos almost every day. The list of issues they talk about is huge, from fashion to videogames, they achieve to capture the attention of their hundreds to even thousands and millions of followers. I am talking about Youtubers, people who have innovated the forms of information and entertainment, especially for young people.

Many Youtubers have become very popular and received recognition in their cities, countries or at a global level. This has led to many communication and media experts criticizing the concept of fame over the last few years. Most Youtubers used to be ordinary people, who one day just decided to record themselves and post videos about their daily lives or their personal opinions on the internet. Using this channel, they gained the same or even greater influence on their perspective audiences as traditional famous artists.

The relationship between Youtubers and their subscribers is quite remarkable! According to a study by Google, 4 in 10 Millennial subscribers say their favorite Youtuber understands them better than their friends. 70% of teenage YouTube subscribers say they relate to YouTube creators more than traditional celebrities. This close relationship gives YouTube content creators the opportunity to influence the lives of young people. The same study indicates that 70% of Millennials believe that YouTube creators influence and shape culture. 

The contributions of Youtubers to migration:

The Youtuber phenomenon has one particularly interesting characteristic: most of them are migrants! For many of these Youtubers, talking about their experience in their host country has become a popular topic for their videos. They talk about cultural differences and similarities, new traditions they learn about, their general experiences as migrants.

They confirm that migrants are not only strong, resilient, compassionate and dedicated, but also creative. Hundreds of Youtubers tell their stories on how they arrived in their host country through creative videos. These clips show their best side, the best of their culture and the ties they create with the people who welcomed them with open arms. Their videos indirectly inspire the fight against xenophobia and discrimination.

Alejandro Velasco is one example of those migrant YouTube influencers. He is from Mexico and he went to Chile to pursue his Master’s Degree in 2012. Through his “Un Wey Weón” project he has created a series of short videos on his experience as a Mexican living in Chile. These clips have gone viral and they have been broadly relayed through the main Chilean media channels.

His YouTube channel has more than 15.000 followers and his Facebook account has over 80.000 followers. Alejandro highlights all the linguistic and cultural differences between Mexico and Chile. His videos have helped to bring Chilean people closer to the Mexican culture and vice versa.  

#IamaMigrant Challenge

Just like Alejandro, there are plenty of other migrant Youtubers who are playing a key role in combatting xenophobia and discrimination against migrants. The impact they have on young people is what makes their videos profoundly valuable in building more inclusive societies. Fully aware of this opportunity, the IOM Regional Office for Central America, North America and the Caribbean launched a campaign for migrant Youtubers. 

The #IamaMigrant campaign is intending to combat negative discourse against migrants through the creativity of migrant YouTube influencers, who are digital ambassadors of their countries of origin. To participate in the campaign, Youtubers have to create a video in which they tell us about their migration experience based on three objects. This is expected to increase sensitization and empathy for other migrants living in the perspective of host countries.

Erika Sinning, a Venezuelan citizen currently living in Canada, was one of the first Youtubers to join the campaign and she told her experience as a migrant based on a pair of shoes and her cellphone. In her video, Erika tells us:

“Migration is like a second chance at life, because you migrate to improve your life, but also to make progress and evolve as a person”

Alejandro Velasco, “Un Wey Weón”, shared his experience by using a Mexican hat, a picture of his family and all the bags of dried hibiscus flower he was able to bring from Mexico. So far, his I am Migrant campaign video has already reached more than 23.000 views on YouTube.

We hope that many other YouTube influencers will join this campaign and continue to foster a positive message about migrants. For further information on the #IamaMigrant Challenge click here.

 

 

 

  About the author:

Jean Pierre Mora Casasola  is a communicator in IOM Regional Office for Central America, North America and the Caribbean. He has served as a consultant in different social organizations and in the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB). He holds a Degree in Advertising from the University “Latinoamericana de Ciencia y Tecnología” (ULACIT), and he is currently getting a Bachelor’s Degree in International Relations at the same university.  Twitter: @jeanpierremora 

 

 


Immigration Matters: How immigrants are relevant to Canada’s development

Immigration Matters: How immigrants are relevant to Canada’s development
Categoria: Migración y Desarrollo
Autor: Autor Invitado

At the end of 2018, the Marketing and Media Department of the Immigration, Refugees, & Citizenship Canada (IRCC) launched the #ImmigrationMatters Campaign, to promote a positive and fact-based public perception of immigration. The campaign was based on the analysis of annual surveys (IRCC has conducted them for the past 25 years!) and focus groups carried out with members of the public across a variety of communities.

The pillars of fact-based communication, storytelling, non-traditional partnerships of the campaign had shown stories of immigrants whose initiatives make Canada a better place for everyone. Such is the case of Javier Bravo, originally from Mexico City, and his online platform where users can send gift certificates that can be used at Peterborough businesses; Igor Bjelac, a Serbian immigrant and his group of volunteers who gather unsold food for people in need in Vancouver (the city with the second largest immigrant population in the country); or Roshni Bahl, who grow up in India and understands how to look after seniors properly.

The campaign’s website contains lots of information regarding stories across Canada,theCanada’s immigration system, and track record. In this last section, the campaign details some facts on how Canada’s immigration system works for both nationals and foreigners. Here are some good inputs to consider when thinking about migrants’ contribution to the destination country:

  • Immigrants contribute to the economy: The Canadian economy is partially calculated by the labour force and their payment of taxes. The more immigrants working, the stronger the labour force gets, especially when the national population is getting older, retiring, and not having as many children as before. The top occupations invited to immigrate under the “Express Entry program” are software engineers and designers, information systems analysts, computer programmers, financial auditors and accountants, as well as advertising, marketing and public relations professionals.
  • Immigrants deliver and improve the health and social services: Many immigrants arriving in Canada are young and pay for the health system more than what they need its benefits. According to the Canadian Council for Refugees, the cost of healthcare for a refugee or refugee claimant, is the 10% of is usually invested in a Canadian. This lower use of the healthcare system is known as the “healthy immigrant” effect.
  • Immigrants integrate fully into Canadian society: Did you know that about one-third of immigrants in Canada have volunteered, and two-thirds are part of social organizations? And the more involved they are with their new home, the more they want to give: According to Statistics Canada, “the immigrants and their descendants who are integrated into a local personal network and participate in community activities, such as religious practices, are more likely to have a higher number of acquaintances with neighbourhood residents, to trust their neighbours and to volunteer.”

The mixed of the immigration system and a sense of belonging results in nearly 85% of the immigrants become citizens after taking a test about Canada’s history and the responsibilities and privileges of citizenship: one of the highest naturalization rates in the world.

We invite you to look into more stories and facts by visiting their website, and to share your own experiences on social media about why #ImmigrantsMatters.