How does technology help migrants from Central America?

MigApp

 

When high-risk journeys take place, such as long walks crossing multiple Central American countries, uncertainty is always present. The surge of information and the variety of sources makes it difficult for migrants to access reliable and pertinent information, this can result in an increase of vulnerability of those who move to another country.

According to World Migration Report 2018, "although many [migrants] are aware that the information provided may not be accurate, prospective migrants may use social media to locate smugglers. […] there are groups, on Facebook for instance, where migrants and asylum seekers search for travelling companions and ask for advice on dangers, risks and reliable smugglers."

To help break this scheme, since June 2018, the International Organization for Migration (IOM), developed the MigApp application (formerly under the name MigrantApp) to answer the most frequent questions and needs of migrants, before, during and after their journey. It is a tool that focuses on relevant information and excludes "boisterous" content.

While the app collects the profile of those who use it (age, sex, countries of transit, among others) to visualize migratory patterns that facilitate the analysis and understanding of the phenomenon to international organizations and governments, the data of those who use the application always remains anonymous. This broadens the information framework for migration governance to promote a safe, regular and orderly migration.

 

How does MigApp help migrants from Central America?

  • Useful information for a safe migration: To reduce the impact of unreliable or dispersed sources, MigApp compiles the requirements of entry and stay in other countries, how to manage work permits, locations of IOM medical centers, migrants’ rights, among others. In this way the user can prepare before traveling and foresee relief spaces during transit.
  • Compares money transfers platforms costs: The financial conditions in which many of these people migrate are precarious and they may need economic help of their relatives and acquaintances along the way. Through MigApp, migrants can compare the prices of different remittance platforms to choose the one that is least expensive.
  • Access to information on basic telephones and/or without Internet: Once downloaded, many of the features of the application do not require access to Internet to be consulted: it is static information always available for those who travel. Also, the application is designed so that it can be installed on any type of mobile device, regardless of its operating system or model.
  • Possibility of return: If a migrant voluntarily decides to return to his/her country, IOM facilitates a safe return, regardless the migratory status of the person requesting it. This request can be made in the different offices of the organization, and through MigApp.  

For more information about MigApp, please visit https://www.iom.int/migapp 

DOWNLOAD MigApp for Android o iOS.

 


Interviewing Rubén Sánchez, Director of 'Zanmi'

Interviewing Rubén Sánchez, Director of 'Zanmi'
Categoria: Communication & Migration
Autor: Laura Manzi

‘Zamni' (2018) is one of the films that participated in the 2020 edition of the Global Migration Film Festival. The short film, which was selected to be screened at regional level by the Regional Office for Central America, North America and the Caribbean, narrates the experiences and daily lives of four Haitian migrants in Chile and their integration process in the South American country.

In this interview, the young director Rubén Sánchez, tells what objectives and motivations guided him towards the creation of the short film.

Why did you choose young Haitian migrants as the protagonists of your work? Is there something in their profile that makes them different from other migrant communities in Chile?

What struck us is that the Haitian population here in Chile is the one that finds it most difficult to integrate into society. One of the main reasons is that they speak another language, the Creole language, and that is an even bigger barrier considering that Chilean Spanish has many idioms and tends to be spoken very quickly. Another obstacle to integration is the racism and rejection of some sectors of society towards the Haitian population: whether because of ethnicity, nationality, language or other prejudices. This leads to more segregation and not integration.

In the short film, there are many scenes that portray different landscapes: the sea, the forest, the city. What is the role of nature in the integration process of migrants?

Climatic conditions and landscapes can be a challenge for integration. For example, Haiti is very flat, there are no mountains and the climate is tropical. Here in Chile, nature and microclimates are quite diverse (the north has higher temperatures, the south is more humid and rainy, while the central zone is a mixture of these).
Nature, however, has also a symbolic purpose in the documentary. The mountain range, which characterizes the Chilean landscape, is the great frontier that any person faces to reach Chile. This justifies the scene that opens and closes the film and represents one of the protagonists in the Embalse del Yeso, which is a place here in Santiago, in the middle of the mountain range. We wanted to film those scenes there as a more oneiric way of representing this enormous wall that is like a border to cross in order to reach Chile, and that at the same time symbolizes the great wall that is in the cultural shock that the Haitian population faces.

‘Life is a circle. A perfect circle of which we are not a part': the protagonists in the film have jobs, go to school, learn Spanish. Then, what are the elements that continue to prevent their integration into the host community, this 'circle' from which they are excluded?

The cultural shock is big. If the host society lives this 'fear of the unknown', the Haitian migrant population in turn reacts and this generates a fear of the community where they live. The lack of integration is made difficult by prejudice and because initiatives that value cultural richness are not promoted. I think this is what we lack as a society: to be more educated. If there is no good education, there will be no people who cannot integrate; we still need to be educated and 'humanized'. I feel that in some way we are also 'dehumanized'. This is what the documentary wants to capture: to reflect on the humanity that we need, the humanity that we need to integrate others, to show that we are all really the same, we are all human beings and we all have dreams.

How much is the director visible in his work? How come are you interested in the subject of migration?

The issue of Haitian migration was, for me, a personal concern, because I live in one of the cities in Chile with the largest Haitian population. I used to witness daily this rejection of the Haitian population in the eyes of the people, in comments that were exchanged by whispering in the bus when I went to the university. I was worried about that.
Also, before I enrolled in audiovisual communication, I studied social work, and had many courses on the migration issue and related social policies. I did a lot of research on Haitian migration, which allowed me to capture the central idea of the short film. During the shooting process, I had the opportunity to meet these young people (Haitian migrants), to live their culture, to taste their food. I was filled with a culture that I didn't know, I was filled with knowledge, with a new experience. I wish this documentary could reach more people, change who we are and cultivate our humanity.