Solutions to address the labor exploitation of migrant populations in Central America

Solutions to address the labor exploitation of migrant populations in Central America

11 / 11 / 2019 | Labour Migration | Guest Contributor

Migrants face different challenges when they settle in their destination countries, including their entry into the labor force. Studies such as CEPAL (link in Spanish) indicate that irregular migrants are more likely to experience poor working conditions and be employed in low-skilled jobs. Including those who obtain a regular status, in some countries, migrants receive salaries below the average of nationals.


What do you call a person who moves within the same country?

What do you call a person who moves within the same country?

11 / 11 / 2019 | Emergencies & Humanitarian Action | Luz Tantaruna

According to IOM, people who move voluntarily within a country are called internal migrants and move for several reasons, both formally and informally. If their movement is forced, they are referred to as internally displaced persons (IDP).

Internal movements from rural areas to urban areas is called urbanization or urban transition.


¿Por qué las personas migrantes arriesgan todo?

Why migrants risk it all

31 / 10 / 2019 | Migration and Development | Guest Contributor

Each year, thousands of people leave their homes in Latin America, the Caribbean and other regions in an effort to secure futures that have become practically unattainable in their countries of origin. Economic dispossession, lack of access to education and employment, violence, and other structural and personal factors have motivated people from all over the world, but mostly from Central American countries, to seek a new life in the United States or other countries within the region.


Engagement of the Caribbean Diaspora: A Potential for Development

Engagement of the Caribbean Diaspora: A Potential for Development

23 / 10 / 2019 | Migration and Development | Guest Contributor

One of the most striking demographic figures in the Caribbean region is the one-to-one ratio of nationals living in their home countries and the members of the diaspora living abroad: 

“There is nearly one person living abroad in the diaspora to every person still resident within the Caribbean, making the diaspora an untapped potential resource for economic development” – World Bank, 2013.

This figure can be perceived as an opportunity to unlock a potential growth in the economy and development of this region if managed adequately.  


How can Central American migrants become regularized in Mexico?

How can Central American migrants become regularized in Mexico?

07 / 10 / 2019 | Immigration and Border Management | Guest Contributor

Thousands of migrants, asylum seekers and Central American refugees go north in search of better opportunities. Most of these people leave from Northern Central American countries (PNCA - Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador).