Communication & Migration

Turn on the microphones! Five keys to giving youth a voice on migration issues

Radio is still a medium that, especially in rural areas where access to the Internet is difficult, is still very much alive and shows itself to be an accessible alternative for the population. Whether in the car, in an app on the phone or in a device that only works with batteries in the most remote areas, the radio is there a few steps away and almost effortlessly. Entertaining us, informing us and accompanying our daily activities.

Almost 60% of unaccompanied migrant children returning to Guatemala identify themselves as belonging to one of the 22 Mayan linguistic groups. Drawing on narratives from their own worldview is helping psychosocial care services strengthen the resilient response as a step prior to family reunification.

We all have things to say and we believe that what we have to say is the most important. Organizations tend to do the same: they have an agenda of things to report, they publish them and claim to have effectively communicated.

Interviewing Rubén Sánchez, Director of 'Zanmi'

‘Zamni' (2018) is one of the films that participated in the 2020 edition of the Global Migration Film Festival. The short film, which was selected to be screened at regional level by the Regional Office for Central America, North America and the Caribbean, narrates the experiences and daily lives of four Haitian migrants in Chile and their integration process in the South American country.

In this interview, the young director Rubén Sánchez, tells what objectives and motivations guided him towards the creation of the short film.

Beating misleading offers in the digital world

"I went to a job search site on Facebook and was offered to host a TV show. I played along, they were supposed to be a TV station, but they didn't even have an office. I told them to come to my office if they wanted to work with me. They stopped writing to me and then the profile casually disappeared," says Carolina (not her real name), a 31-year-old Salvadoran who participated in a session of the IOM's “Think Twice” Virtual Camp on Migration.

Beating misleading offers in the digital world

"I went to a job search site on Facebook and was offered to host a TV show. I played along, they were supposed to be a TV station, but they didn't even have an office. I told them to come to my office if they wanted to work with me. They stopped writing to me and then the profile casually disappeared," says Carolina (not her real name), a 31-year-old Salvadoran who participated in a session of the IOM's “Think Twice” Virtual Camp on Migration.

Interviewing Kristina Rodemann, director of 'Skin Hunger’

'Skin Hunger' is a short film from 2019, selected among the films that the Regional Office for Central America, North America and the Caribbean has screened on the occasion of the Global Migration Film Festival in 2020. ‘Skin Hunger’ tells the story of a Mexican woman, Ximena, who works in the United States to support her family in Mexico. Ximena suffers from the distance from her loved ones, the loneliness she feels in her new home and the lack of human contact and warmth.

The current outbreak of the coronavirus COVID-19 is, above all, a health problem. However, it also has unprecedented consequences for mobility, as it has involved changes in the management of migration and borders, and in the situations of migrants.

Central America is one of the most dynamic migratory corridors in the world. Migrants that come from as far away as Africa and Asia pass through this region; from countries in neighboring regions such as Haiti, Cuba and Venezuela; migrants who leave the countries of northern Central America and Mexico seeking to enter the United States; Nicaraguans who arrive in Costa Rica and Ngäbe Bugle Indians who move from Panama, many of whom go to work in the coffee harvest and then return to their regions of origin.

The world is full of communication campaigns, each competing for the attention of a particular audience and hoping to increase people's understanding and awareness of a topic. However, the creation of these campaigns usually follows institutional and one-dimensional communication lines that rarely incorporate real impact measurement mechanisms.