Migrants in Countries in Crisis: what to do?

 

Recent events such as the Tohoku Tsunami in Japan, floods in Thailand (2011), Hurricane Sandy in the United States, and conflicts in Libya and Yemen are some examples of crisis situations in which migrants are among the most affected populations. Language and cultural barriers, restrictions to mobilization, irregular status, loss of personal documents, limited access to support networks and discrimination, are factors which may affect migrants during crisis. Moreover, in some unfortunate cases migrants remain excluded from the official protection mechanisms.

In this context, Migrants in Countries in Crisis Initiative (MICIC) was launched in 2014, and led by the United States and the Philippines. The initiative promoted broad and inclusive evidence-gathering and facilitated series of consultations, which resulted in the development of a set of principles, guidelines, and practices intended to provide guidance to States in order to better protect migrant in crisis situations. 

MICIC Initiative proposes 10 principles to States on how to prepare for and respond to crisis in ways that protect migrants during the time of crisis:

  1. First, save lives. Respect for the inherent humanity and dignity of migrants means all possible efforts should be taken to save lives, regardless of immigration status.
  2. As human beings, all migrants are entitled to human rights. At all times, the human rights of migrants should be respected.
  3. States bear the primary responsibility to protect migrants within their territories and their own citizens, including when they are abroad. Host States and States of transit have responsibilities towards all persons within their territories, including migrants, regardless of their immigration status.
  4. Private sector actors, international organizations, and civil society play a significant role in protecting migrants and in supporting States to protect migrants.
  5. Humanitarian action to protect migrants should be guided by the principles of humanity, neutrality, impartiality, and independence.
  6. Migrants are rights holders and capable actors, resilient and creative in the face of adversities. They are not merely victims or passive recipients of assistance. While crisis affect individual migrants differently, they have the capacity to take charge of their own safety and wellbeing and should be responsible for doing so, provided they have access to the necessary information and support.
  7. Migrants strengthen the vitality of both their host States and States of origin in multiple ways. Migrants provide for and contribute to their families, communities, and societies. Positive communication about migrants promotes tolerance, non-discrimination, inclusiveness, and respect toward migrants.
  8. Action at the local, national, regional, and international levels is necessary to improve responses. Local authorities and non-State local actors, including local communities and community leaders, are particularly well placed to understand and address needs during crisis.
  9. Partnerships, cooperation, and coordination are essential between and among States, private sector actors, international organizations, civil society, local communities, and migrants.
  10. Continuous research, learning, and innovation improve our collective response. Regular assessments and evaluations of past experiences in protecting migrants in countries experiencing conflicts or natural disasters can inform planning, preparation, and responses.

MICIC Initiative also provides guidelines and practices, which will be addressed in our next blog posts. If you are interested in learning more about this issue, the report is available here: GUIDELINES TO PROTECT MIGRANTS IN COUNTRIES EXPERIENCING CONFLICT OR NATURAL DISASTER

 

 

   About the author:

Jean Pierre Mora Casasola is a Communications Specialist at IOM Regional Office for Central America, North America and the Caribbean. He has served as a consultant in different social organizations and in the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB). He holds a Degree in Advertising from the University “Latinoamericana de Ciencia y Tecnología” (ULACIT), and he is currently getting a Bachelor’s Degree in International Relations at the same university.  Twitter: @jeanpierremora 

 


Turn on the microphones! Five keys to giving youth a voice on migration issues

Turn on the microphones! Five keys to giving youth a voice on migration issues
Categoria: Communication & Migration
Autor: Guest Contributor

Radio is still a medium that, especially in rural areas where access to the Internet is difficult, is still very much alive and shows itself to be an accessible alternative for the population. Whether in the car, in an app on the phone or in a device that only works with batteries in the most remote areas, the radio is there a few steps away and almost effortlessly. Entertaining us, informing us and accompanying our daily activities. From the largest cities to the most sparsely populated municipalities, radio is an industry that generates jobs and is vital for the dissemination of mass messages to a wide variety of audiences.

How can radio be harnessed as an avenue to empower young people about migration?

After seeing the high impact that this media has on the culture of our communities, these are some actions to be taken that will allow us to bring the message of regular, orderly and safe migration to a youth who may be victims of crimes associated with irregular migration:

  • Find out about community radio or radio stations in your city: This will help you to know all the spaces that exist within the community and to identify the audiences they are aimed at in order to choose the right channel that connects with young people.
  • Identify young leaders in their communities with communication skills: There is no better way to communicate with youth than through voices they can empathize with and identify with.
  • Create content that connects: Talking about migration does not require a serious or monotonous tone. Try to create short but effective messages with easy to understand language and prioritizing the use of storytelling instead of communicating concepts.
  • Create your own online radio station: The radio has undergone a significant evolution in recent years and proof of this is that the number of Internet radio stations has been increasing, which has led to the democratization of radio. You no longer need big budgets to have your own radio station and broadcast different contents 24 hours a day, this is a good alternative if there are not or do not have access to have space on traditional radio stations.
  • Develop empowering initiatives: Young people possess many talents: dynamism, fast learning and, of course, a lot of creativity. Therefore generating training spaces on radio production issues will help to discover hidden talents and form new opinion leaders, without leaving behind the importance of also empowering them on migration issues, this will allow them to transmit better messages that promote a safe, orderly and regular human mobility and will help them themselves to make better decisions regarding migration.

A success story of such activities is 'Youth on the Airwaves', a workshop on radio and migration that harnesses the energy of young people who are leaders in their communities and shows them the potential of the radio industry as a method of generating livelihoods and making their voices heard.

As a product of this initiative, the young people created their own radio spots to promote a better informed migration, from the ideation of the creative concept, script development, voice-over practice, recording and editing, in all these processes they received the support of both IOM staff and a team of experts in radio production.

A few years ago, former United Nations Secretary Ban Ki-moon stressed that "radio is very important to make the voice of youth heard, it stimulates the imagination and shortens the distances between people". One more reason to bring the media closer and generate spaces for youth in order to disseminate messages aimed at providing the population with sufficient and verified information that will allow them to make better decisions before embarking on a migratory route.