Caribbean Countries Tackle Data Collection Challenges in Regional Workshop


Date Publish: 
09/28/2018

Montego Bay – Representatives of 13 countries participated in a specialised workshop this week (24-25/09), through which the UN Migration Agency (IOM) and its initiative for Caribbean Migration Consultations (CMC) promoted coordination and collaboration in the collection and analysis of migration data in the region.

“Data analysis has been one of the main weaknesses for an adequate management of migration in the Caribbean. The availability of relevant and high-quality information is still very limited,” noted Marcelo Pisani, Regional Director of IOM for Central America, North America and the Caribbean.

“In response to this need, we organized a workshop that enables decision-makers to know best practices for collection and management of migratory data, gathering important representatives of migration agencies and statistical institutions to better comprehend and use data linked to migration, refugee protection and development policies,” Pisani added.

The Planning Institute of Jamaica (PIOJ), the Statistical Institute of Jamaica (STATIN) and UNHCR also collaborated to successfully run this in event under the CMC framework.

The initiative aims to assess migration data needs in the context of the Sustainable Development Agenda. Participants identified challenges, gaps, needs, opportunities, resources and best practices utilized by other countries for the management of migration information, with the purpose of developing feasible mechanisms to improve collection, analysis and exchange of information in the region.

Accurate and relevant migration data could allow states to strengthen and better focus their responses to natural disasters and human movements, increasing the positive impact of interventions, projects and programmes. 

“Interventions designed using quality data have the opportunity for far greater effectiveness in migration management, as well as for the protection and assistance of identified and targeted groups,” said Brendan Tarnay, IOM Project Coordinator for CMC. “Quality data and data sharing can significantly reduce the number of duplicated records in public services. The work and collaboration at this CMC meeting will lead to greater inter-agency communication and data sharing, a priority already identified by participating governments.”

The regional workshop was made possible with support from the United States Department of State, Bureau of Population, Refugees and Migration (PRM), and the cooperation of the Government of Jamaica, the United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR) and IOM's Global Migration Data Analysis Centre (GMDAC).

For more information, please contact Brendan Tarnay at the IOM Office for Central America, North America and the Caribbean; Tel: +506 2212 5312, Email: btarnay@iom.int


'Help Us, Help More': Support IOM’s Efforts to Assist Vulnerable Venezuelans

Date Publish: 
18 / 12 / 2018

 

Geneva – In line with the global theme for International Migrants Day 2018, Migration with Dignity, the International Organization for Migration (IOM) calls on the public to take action and help support vulnerable refugees and migrants from Venezuela in Latin America and the Caribbean.

IOM is reaching out to sympathetic and motivated allies of migrants to be part of the solution. The first in a series of IOM calls for action, Help us, Help more will share stories of the dignity, strength and resilience of people on the move, and will encourage individuals to support vulnerable refugees and migrants along their journeys, through online donations.

There are three million refugees and migrants from Venezuela, of which 2.4 million have left their homes and livelihoods behind in the last three years, in search of a better future. Travelling by air, road or on foot, on average 5,500 Venezuelans have left the country every day in 2018.

Emily Durán, 39, from Valencia, Venezuela, travelled over 1,700 kilometres to Cali, Colombia, where she was making a temporary stop before heading to the Colombia-Ecuador border town of Ipiales. IOM spoke to her about her six-week long journey:

“There were many difficult times on the way,” she explained. “I walked from Cúcuta to Cali… We had to sleep on the streets and had to keep walking for kilometres. It felt like we would never arrive.”

Watch the full interview with Emily Durán here.

Many of the refugees and migrants who enter Colombia opt to remain. Others, like Durán, are making plans to move onwards to Ecuador, Perú, Chile or Argentina. Brazil, México, and select Central American and Caribbean countries have also received Venezuelans.

“Some days I wish I hadn’t left my country, just to face even more troubles,” said Durán. IOM missions in the field provide lifesaving assistance to Venezuelan refugees and migrants through the distribution of food, medicine and emergency kits. In some countries IOM helps Venezuelans find temporary housing, while in others IOM operates transit shelters. Family reunification and cultural integration of Venezuelans, also part of IOM’s mission, help ease the transition into their new lives.

Host communities and governments have been generous with their support. But we need to do more: Help us, Help more

For more information please contact Deepika Nath at IOM Geneva, Tel: +41 22 717 9897, Email: dnath@iom.int